Ecosystem management

A Hawksbill sea turtle swimming over a reef.

A new study using ground breaking science for environmental management has revealed the lifespans of five species of marine turtles.

close up of whale shark from the front

Turtle nail clippings, diving whale sharks and 12 million mushroom corals are key research discoveries from Ningaloo Reef.

White coral with crown-of-thorns starfish on it

New research is helping to prevent outbreaks of crown-of-thorn starfish, a major threat to the Great Barrier Reef.

white sharkunderwater water with sunlight coming through the water

Extensive tracking of the southern-western white shark population has revealed epic oceanic excursions, including a 12,240 km return trip to sub-Antarctic waters.

offshore oil and gas platform in the ocean

Can the rigs of today become the reefs of tomorrow? CSIRO is working with industry partners to explore the future of our oil and gas infrastructure.

Colourful fish and coral at Wheeler Reef in 2012. The reef is situated in the central GBR off Townsville. Picture by Paul Muir.

Two of Australia’s most iconic ecosystems, eucalypt trees and reef corals, could end up being the ‘best of pals’ when it comes to fighting climate change.

Post-fire recovery

While attention to bushfire recovery often centres on above ground developments – rebuilt buildings and a return of green tree canopies – it's what happens below the surface that often determines how successful recovery actually is.

Satellite image over the Great Barrier Reef showing reef structures

Detection of oil spills using state of the art satellite imagery will support Australian environmental agencies to manage and protect the Great Barrier Reef, and other Australian marine regions.

Three white birds taking flight from a wetland.

Management of the Lower Lakes system in South Australia has been informed by extensive science. Understanding the impacts of climate change and adaptation remain future challenges for the region and the Murray-Darling Basin as a whole.