Oceans

An aerial view of the Mungalla wetland

Australia's coastal and marine ecosystems have suffered death from a thousand cuts. But scientists say it’s possible to bring them back from the brink – if we act now.

A black and white seabird flying over the ocean.

CSIRO researchers have again played a major role in the latest Australia State of the Environment report as lead authors on both the Marine and Coasts chapters. In a first, Indigenous knowledge and perspectives have been included, thanks to some of their work.

Ocean with cloudy sky above

Predicting the ocean requires mind-boggling technology, from salty robotic drifters and pristine supercomputers. But when it comes to the crunch, what is the first step?

catches of redleg banana prawns being unloaded after being caught in the Joseph Bonaparte Gulf

CSIRO research is helping Australian fisheries adapt to seas that are warming at a rate far greater than elsewhere around the globe.

Scalloped hammerheads occur in tropical and temperate oceans around the world, but are their populations connected? A new genetic study using whole genome methods has found out.

A black and white high resolution scan of a otolith

New methods for estimating fish ages show smaller but long-lived bigeye tuna are part of a sustainable fishery in the western Pacific Ocean.

Earth Observation images show the mouth of the Clarence River before the flood on February 9 (left) and after, on March 3, with a sediment plume calculated to be 10km extending well off the coast into the Tasman Sea. Credit: European Union. Modified data from Copernicus Sentinel-2, processed with the Sentinel Hub EO Browser.

Data cubes built using decades of satellite images reveal how the quality of estuarine and coastal waters changes after weather events, and over time.

Aerial photo of a a ship and an oil spill

Oil spills can cause significant environmental damage. We have developed new oil spill response technology that focuses on removing small oil droplets. And it all starts off with the humble domestic sponge ...

The International Space Station was orbiting above the Northern Territory of Australia when this photograph was taken of the Gulf of Carpentaria including (from bottom left to right) the Pellew Islands, Wellesley Islands and South Wellesley Islands. One of the station's main solar arrays drapes the left side of this photograph.

Human advancement is testing the resilience of our coasts, from the molecular level to the planetary. CSIRO's technologies are helping manage our changing coasts.