Remote sensing

Ocean with cloudy sky above

Predicting the ocean requires mind-boggling technology, from salty robotic drifters and pristine supercomputers. But when it comes to the crunch, what is the first step?

Earth Observation images show the mouth of the Clarence River before the flood on February 9 (left) and after, on March 3, with a sediment plume calculated to be 10km extending well off the coast into the Tasman Sea. Credit: European Union. Modified data from Copernicus Sentinel-2, processed with the Sentinel Hub EO Browser.

Data cubes built using decades of satellite images reveal how the quality of estuarine and coastal waters changes after weather events, and over time.

The International Space Station was orbiting above the Northern Territory of Australia when this photograph was taken of the Gulf of Carpentaria including (from bottom left to right) the Pellew Islands, Wellesley Islands and South Wellesley Islands. One of the station's main solar arrays drapes the left side of this photograph.

Human advancement is testing the resilience of our coasts, from the molecular level to the planetary. CSIRO's technologies are helping manage our changing coasts.

Australia is one of the sunniest places on the planet. That means we lose large volumes of water from our reservoirs through evaporation. Our scientists have created a way to measure evaporation rates with expert precision, helping to better manage water resources.

A satellite image of the coast of Queensland near Townsville. A brown plume swirls into the blue/green water near the coast at the mouth of the Burdekin River.

This interactive platform puts information about management options and past, present, and future conditions of the Reef at users’ flipper-tips.

Aerial image of south-western Victoria. A red dot shows Cobden and there is a trail of smoke blowing to the west.

In recent years there has been an increase in the occurrence of peat fires. Smoke from these events can significantly impact surrounding communities due to the health risks associated with prolonged poor air quality. Using an air quality forecasting system (AQFx), CSIRO researchers are helping authorities to minimise this impact.

Integrated ocean observation systems are playing a critical role in preparing us for future climate challenges.

Satellite image over the Great Barrier Reef showing reef structures

Detection of oil spills using state of the art satellite imagery will support Australian environmental agencies to manage and protect the Great Barrier Reef, and other Australian marine regions.

Cut for hay.

Cut for hay or grow to grain? A pilot trial unlocks information about the fodder market during times of drought and aims to help farm finances and aid drought relief.