Aquaculture

A prawn

Kirsten Rose - Executive Director of Future Industries - reflects on CSIRO's 90 years of work in northern Australia, and outlines our vision for the future.

Our scientists have been working in northern Australia for more than 90 years. Science and technology continues to transform the north, a region spanning more than 40 per cent of Australia's land mass.

Seafood dish

Verifying the origin of Australia’s agrifood can help to grow our exports.

Fisherman with a pompano fish.

To meet growing consumer demand, CSIRO researchers are on the hunt for healthy and affordable protein sources from white flesh fish.

Graphic of an offshore ocean environment including aquaculture, and wind farms

As the pandemic impacts industries across the world, managing ocean resources sustainably is more important than ever to spur new marine and economic opportunities.

seagrass

Natural capital accounting can help fisheries businesses assess the risks and opportunities associated with the ecosystem assets they rely on.

Shipping port.

COVID-19 has exposed vulnerabilities in our global food systems, which have become designed around “just-in-time” principles to maximise efficiency. As we start to look at what life will be like after this pandemic, can we reconfigure our supply chains around resilience and sustainability to guard against the impact of future shocks?

Drone image of a fishing vessel in port

Technology adapted from the security industry is being taken to the oceans to monitor fishing operations, manage the seafood supply chain and ensure the sustainability of our fisheries.

Black tiger prawns in hand

CSIRO’s efforts to help the Australian farmed prawn industry recover from this devastating outbreak also required a rapid response to protect a vital research facility that is assisting the industry pick itself back up.