Biodiversity

A picture of an Aboriginal woman's hands holding out 4 witjuti grubs (caterpillars)

New collaborations and First Nations co-developed initiatives can unlock the potential of the edible insect industry in Australia.

A large storm depicted by rolling grey clouds looms in the sky above Sydney Harbour. Image Richard Hirst.

With extreme events impacting our cities more than ever before, twenty-two experts from around the globe have the technological, environmental and social answers.

A person pulling bark aside from a tree.

Language is powerful. It is one way that we, as humans, share knowledge, stories and what matters to us. In partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People, the Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) has been linking language and ancestral, Indigenous ecological knowledge to Western science in its biodiversity data infrastructure.

Overhead view of a research vessel at sea.

Australia’s oceans are big, beautiful and bountiful in resources. Our national ocean research vessel Investigator delivers the capability to help us understand and protect them.

Deep sea delights: this coral species, Victorgorgia eminens, and its snake star symbiont, was discovered living in the seamounts off the coast of Tasmania

CSIRO scientists are finding life in Australia’s cold-water ocean depths that few humans ever see.

Tuna in cane baskets on a dock, being inspected by people

With a team at CSIRO’s Australian National Fish Collection in Hobart, Helen O'Neill is working to make fish identification easier for Indonesian fishery workers.

Giant kelp photographed underwater.

Both giant kelp and Synechococcus are being cultured in CSIRO’s Australian National Algae Culture Collection in Hobart, where scientists study impacts on algae in our warming world.

Pictured are dive staff from a Townsville tourism operator sitting on the front of a boat. They are pictured visiting John Brewer Reef. Image by Matt Curnock, CSIRO.

Get a glimpse into how the Great Barrier Reef has fared over the summer and the actions being taken to protect it.

Close-up shot of a Loggerhead turtle with barnacles on its shell swimming over coral reefs.

eDNA is poised to revolutionise the way we monitor Australia’s natural environment but it relies on a complete reference library of DNA barcodes. That's where we step in. CSIRO is working with partners to create this library for Australia’s most important species.