Ecosystem management

Indigenous fisher wearing snorkel on his head holding a rock lobster caught with a spearing device

In the face of climate change, innovative science and cultural knowledge will be critical for protecting ecosystems, marine life and livelihoods.

Longtail tuna fish in a basket

New DNA and microchemistry analysis reveals multiple populations among the Indian Ocean’s tunas and will underpin improved fisheries management.

A diver wearing goggles holding a Prickly redfish.

After years of mutual learning, a safety net is in place for the Torres Strait Beche-de-mer Fishery.

Looking up at a eucalptus forest canopy

Those who know the price of everything are said to know the value of nothing – but could measuring the value of nature help preserve it?

Digital decision-support tools are now deployed in many aspects of agronomy, but how about for the management of weeds, pests and diseases?

Agriculture uses an array of chemicals to control weeds, pests and diseases. However, a systems approach to reduce, redesign or replace chemical use will be needed to meet new demands.

2. Aerial flood photographs taken in the Townsville region

Shading corals to reduce mass bleaching and expanding the control of coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish—if socially acceptable and done on a large scale—could buy at least 10 to 20 years for the Great Barrier Reef, according to scientists who have for the first time modelled all of the world’s biggest marine ecosystem.

A satellite image of the coast of Queensland near Townsville. A brown plume swirls into the blue/green water near the coast at the mouth of the Burdekin River.

This interactive platform puts information about management options and past, present, and future conditions of the Reef at users’ flipper-tips.

Close-up shot of a Loggerhead turtle with barnacles on its shell swimming over coral reefs.

eDNA is poised to revolutionise the way we monitor Australia’s natural environment but it relies on a complete reference library of DNA barcodes. That's where we step in. CSIRO is working with partners to create this library for Australia’s most important species.