Ecosystem management

Close up of brown and yellow flowers with a tiny silvery moth.

For many decades Australia’s native pollinators have lived in the shadow of the honeybee. In this article, we shine some light on the intricate roles of a group of tiny moths that pollinate boronias.

Two men looking at a hand-held piece of technology. An older man, wearing a ranger uniform and baseball cap, is explaining to the younger man next to him.

Indigenous data, information and knowledge underpin the stewardship of Country by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. This information is also essential for broader management of Australia’s environment, as underscored in the latest State of the Environment report.

A woodland landscape photo

For the first time, the five-yearly State of the Environment Report includes an entire Indigenous-led theme, Indigenous co-lead authors on most chapters, and Indigenous-specific case studies.

Two colourful birds on a twig

With the release of the latest scientific report card on the state of Australia’s environment, we look at the underpinning science tools that have enabled the assessment, and how they can support our environmental restoration efforts.

Hand holding red seeds

It’s been two years since the release of Our Knowledge Our Way in caring for Country. Since then, the Best Practice Guidelines have been used by government, industry, researchers and non-governmental organisations.

Aerial photo of a a ship and an oil spill

Oil spills can cause significant environmental damage. We have developed new oil spill response technology that focuses on removing small oil droplets. And it all starts off with the humble domestic sponge ...

The Mataranka Springs Complex is a unique water resource in the Northern Territory. Recent CSIRO research has uncovered important new information about the sources of water for the Springs.

We're helping to support informed decision making when it comes to safeguarding environmental values in the Beetaloo and Cooper geological basins.

Digital technology can help Indigenous rangers adaptively manage their lands. But it's critical that these tools are co-designed by Traditional Owners to ensure that they deliver benefit back to Indigenous communities. A collaboration called Healthy Country AI is helping to do just that.