Climate change

A pelican standing in water

By 2050, the Gippsland Lakes could experience temperature increases of 1.6 degrees Celsius, sea-level rise of 25 centimetres and more frequent bushfires. So what can be done to protect the site?

A bird's-eye-view of the Kenaook Cape Grim station on the edge of a cliff, with ocean below.

The recent, rapid rise in levels of methane in our atmosphere is causing concern among scientists. So why is it happening?

An aerial view of the Mungalla wetland

Australia's coastal and marine ecosystems have suffered death from a thousand cuts. But scientists say it’s possible to bring them back from the brink – if we act now.

Ocean with cloudy sky above

Predicting the ocean requires mind-boggling technology, from salty robotic drifters and pristine supercomputers. But when it comes to the crunch, what is the first step?

A bushfire burns in the distance in Victoria.

When a natural disaster occurs, scientists often get asked ‘how did climate change contribute?’. Modelling and data analysis are helping answer this, and other questions about frequency and severity of extremes.

Tree ferns seen resprouting amidst a charred landscape

With the leading global climate science body, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, due to publish a synthesis of its sixth report in September, three CSIRO contributors to the report series reflect on CSIRO’s contribution to global climate science.

The risk of more frequent and extreme natural hazards is rising with climate change. When these extreme events 'collide', their impacts compound—making communities more vulnerable to crises. How can we prevent potential systemic failures caused by extreme events?

An abandoned car sits among the ash as a reminder of the Kosciuszko fire, Snowy Mountains, Australia. Pictured on the shores of Jourama Pondage Talbingo January 2020. Image by Kate Langford, CSIRO

Dealing with the rising threat of wildfires has become a global concern.

Aerial photo of a golf course on Norfolk Isalnd

On Norfolk Island, conserving water has been a way of life for generations. But when the island faced a water emergency in 2019-20, it became clear the natural water balance was changing. A detailed study of the island’s water resources is revealing what’s behind the change and how the island might strengthen its future water resilience.