Monitoring

Trees in a desert, where there is evidence of resprouting and regrowth.

How is the science of ecology helping our ecosystems adapt to climate change and other human pressures? ECOS put the question to Dr Suzanne Prober, leader of CSIRO’s Adaptive Ecosystem Management team.

Sunrise over a field of canola

Overseas demand for more sustainable food is a high value opportunity for Australian agribusinesses. Research is looking at how we can capture that opportunity.

Digital decision-support tools are now deployed in many aspects of agronomy, but how about for the management of weeds, pests and diseases?

Australia is one of the sunniest places on the planet. That means we lose large volumes of water from our reservoirs through evaporation. Our scientists have created a way to measure evaporation rates with expert precision, helping to better manage water resources.

Researchers at Heron Island

Our researchers have been on the larvae lookout of the coral kind on the Great Barrier Reef to trial new, innovative techniques to restore damaged parts of the Reef.

Aerial image of south-western Victoria. A red dot shows Cobden and there is a trail of smoke blowing to the west.

In recent years there has been an increase in the occurrence of peat fires. Smoke from these events can significantly impact surrounding communities due to the health risks associated with prolonged poor air quality. Using an air quality forecasting system (AQFx), CSIRO researchers are helping authorities to minimise this impact.

Researcher Dr Warish Ahmed in the CSIRO laboratory

Scientists have found an early-warning tool for COVID-19 in our sewage to help detect its spread. Here's a run down on how it works.

A Hawksbill sea turtle swimming over a reef.

A new study using ground breaking science for environmental management has revealed the lifespans of five species of marine turtles.

white sharkunderwater water with sunlight coming through the water

Extensive tracking of the southern-western white shark population has revealed epic oceanic excursions, including a 12,240 km return trip to sub-Antarctic waters.