Environmental monitoring

Revegetation and pile fields on the Mary River in January 2022, prior to recent flood events. Photograph by Caitlin Mill, Mary River Catchment Coordinating Committee.

Deteriorating water quality is one of the biggest threats to the Great Barrier Reef. Vital protection and recovery efforts are taking place in the catchments adjoining this national treasure's coastline.

A black and white seabird flying over the ocean.

CSIRO researchers have again played a major role in the latest Australia State of the Environment report as lead authors on both the Marine and Coasts chapters. In a first, Indigenous knowledge and perspectives have been included, thanks to some of their work.

A woodland landscape photo

For the first time, the five-yearly State of the Environment Report includes an entire Indigenous-led theme, Indigenous co-lead authors on most chapters, and Indigenous-specific case studies.

Two colourful birds on a twig

With the release of the latest scientific report card on the state of Australia’s environment, we look at the underpinning science tools that have enabled the assessment, and how they can support our environmental restoration efforts.

Earth Observation images show the mouth of the Clarence River before the flood on February 9 (left) and after, on March 3, with a sediment plume calculated to be 10km extending well off the coast into the Tasman Sea. Credit: European Union. Modified data from Copernicus Sentinel-2, processed with the Sentinel Hub EO Browser.

Data cubes built using decades of satellite images reveal how the quality of estuarine and coastal waters changes after weather events, and over time.

The International Space Station was orbiting above the Northern Territory of Australia when this photograph was taken of the Gulf of Carpentaria including (from bottom left to right) the Pellew Islands, Wellesley Islands and South Wellesley Islands. One of the station's main solar arrays drapes the left side of this photograph.

Human advancement is testing the resilience of our coasts, from the molecular level to the planetary. CSIRO's technologies are helping manage our changing coasts.

Trees in a desert, where there is evidence of resprouting and regrowth.

How is the science of ecology helping our ecosystems adapt to climate change and other human pressures? ECOS put the question to Dr Suzanne Prober, leader of CSIRO’s Adaptive Ecosystem Management team.

Sunrise over a field of canola

Overseas demand for more sustainable food is a high value opportunity for Australian agribusinesses. Research is looking at how we can capture that opportunity.

Researchers at Heron Island

Our researchers have been on the larvae lookout of the coral kind on the Great Barrier Reef to trial new, innovative techniques to restore damaged parts of the Reef.