Ecosystem management

Agriculture uses an array of chemicals to control weeds, pests and diseases. However, a systems approach to reduce, redesign or replace chemical use will be needed to meet new demands.

2. Aerial flood photographs taken in the Townsville region

Shading corals to reduce mass bleaching and expanding the control of coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish—if socially acceptable and done on a large scale—could buy at least 10 to 20 years for the Great Barrier Reef, according to scientists who have for the first time modelled all of the world’s biggest marine ecosystem.

A satellite image of the coast of Queensland near Townsville. A brown plume swirls into the blue/green water near the coast at the mouth of the Burdekin River.

This interactive platform puts information about management options and past, present, and future conditions of the Reef at users’ flipper-tips.

Close-up shot of a Loggerhead turtle with barnacles on its shell swimming over coral reefs.

eDNA is poised to revolutionise the way we monitor Australia’s natural environment but it relies on a complete reference library of DNA barcodes. That's where we step in. CSIRO is working with partners to create this library for Australia’s most important species.

Researchers at Heron Island

Our researchers have been on the larvae lookout of the coral kind on the Great Barrier Reef to trial new, innovative techniques to restore damaged parts of the Reef.

Lush green forest and mountains surrounding a lake at Cradle Mountain, Tasmania

Scientists examine 19 ecosystems under pressure, from the beautiful to the rare.

Graphic of an offshore ocean environment including aquaculture, and wind farms

As the pandemic impacts industries across the world, managing ocean resources sustainably is more important than ever to spur new marine and economic opportunities.

seagrass

Natural capital accounting can help fisheries businesses assess the risks and opportunities associated with the ecosystem assets they rely on.

In his latest documentary, David Attenborough: A Life on Our Planet, the famed naturalist maps how steeply the planet’s biodiversity has diminished over his lifetime. Its release coincides with a United Nations Summit on Biodiversity which has called for urgent action on biodiversity for sustainable development.