Ecosystem management

Australia’s soil, water, vegetation and biodiversity, and our vast marine estate, are incredibly valuable national assets, which need to be managed effectively. There are still significant gaps in our understanding of these components, and the ways in which they interact. We need to understand them so we can manage them sustainably.

About 3000 feral pigs are culled every year in the Archer River Basin on Cape York. But is this helping to protect the things we care about? Together, local people and scientists are building a case for targeted pig management in place of culling programs aimed at killing as many pigs as possible.

A new approach to help ecosystems bounce back after human disturbances was applied to a simulated disaster at Ningaloo Reef, and is applicable for decision-makers in other marine and terrestrial contexts.

Plant with reddish-purple berries

Researchers have estimated the number of tropical tree species, and it's likely to be between approximately 40,000 and 53,000. The Indo-Pacific region is as rich in tree species as tropical America.

Flock of birds flying off shore over beach

Every year five million shorebirds migrate between the Arctic and Australia along a bird superhighway known as the East Asian-Australasian flyway. Coastal development is destroying the tidal flats birds depend on, and sea level rise is emerging as an additional threat. A new artificial intelligence technique offers a conservation solution.

A group of people standing in a grassy paddock with hats on

What will the future look like in 10, 50 or 100 years? Are our human and ecological systems prepared for […]

Brown head of a termite showing mouthparts

Insects play an invaluable role in our ecosystems and sustain our society. It's a role that often goes unnoticed and one that we still don't fully understand.

Who speaks for the tidal flat? There are many voices for the mangrove forest, the coral reef and the seagrass meadow, but the chorus for the mud, sand and silt flats that sit hidden under shallow water for most of the tidal cycle is often silent.