Posts – Page 4 – ECOS

A bushfire burns in the distance in Victoria.

When a natural disaster occurs, scientists often get asked ‘how did climate change contribute?’. Modelling and data analysis are helping answer this, and other questions about frequency and severity of extremes.

Tree ferns seen resprouting amidst a charred landscape

With the leading global climate science body, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, due to publish a synthesis of its sixth report in September, three CSIRO contributors to the report series reflect on CSIRO’s contribution to global climate science.

Earth Observation images show the mouth of the Clarence River before the flood on February 9 (left) and after, on March 3, with a sediment plume calculated to be 10km extending well off the coast into the Tasman Sea. Credit: European Union. Modified data from Copernicus Sentinel-2, processed with the Sentinel Hub EO Browser.

Data cubes built using decades of satellite images reveal how the quality of estuarine and coastal waters changes after weather events, and over time.

Aerial photo of a a ship and an oil spill

Oil spills can cause significant environmental damage. We have developed new oil spill response technology that focuses on removing small oil droplets. And it all starts off with the humble domestic sponge ...

The International Space Station was orbiting above the Northern Territory of Australia when this photograph was taken of the Gulf of Carpentaria including (from bottom left to right) the Pellew Islands, Wellesley Islands and South Wellesley Islands. One of the station's main solar arrays drapes the left side of this photograph.

Human advancement is testing the resilience of our coasts, from the molecular level to the planetary. CSIRO's technologies are helping manage our changing coasts.

With 100 per cent of Australia’s lithium-ion batteries currently imported from overseas, an opportunity exists for Australia to build the whole battery value chain from mining of battery minerals to processing, battery active materials and eventually cell manufacture.

The risk of more frequent and extreme natural hazards is rising with climate change. When these extreme events 'collide', their impacts compound—making communities more vulnerable to crises. How can we prevent potential systemic failures caused by extreme events?

3D printed foods on a plate

3D printing is opening up a whole world of new food product opportunities.

Critical and rare earth minerals will underpin the clean energy transition. Our national leaders have signalled the importance of mining and refining critical minerals in Australia. But what are these resources, and what’s at stake?