Posts – Page 3 – ECOS

A De Vis' Banded Snake (Denisonia devisi) pictured in Glenmorgan, Queensland, Australia. Image by Melissa Bruton/Flickr

It’s becoming more important than ever to know where plants and animals live, and why. A CSIRO researcher who has been in the field for decades is encouraging everyone to take a fresh look.

man in hard hat beside river inserting device into pipe

CSIRO’s automated real-time in-situ groundwater monitoring system Vesi™ has funding to dive into new territories to revolutionise the way industries and utilities can manage water quality.

Aerial view of remote Australian town

Humans have re-used wastewater for thousands of years. As demand for fresh water supplies grow, communities need improved water re-use technologies to give them resilient, sustainable and high-quality water stocks.

Picture of Windsor Bridge disappearing into flood waters in March 2022.

With Australians facing the prospect of ‘big wets’ and ‘long drys’, a group of researchers at CSIRO explain why we need to shift our approach in decision-making when investing in resilient infrastructure.

Yellow flowers of a canola field under a clear blue sky.

A changing climate, declining arable lands and an increasing demand for more environmentally friendly products is making us think outside the box when it comes to food production and traditional agricultural production. How can we produce more food with fewer resources?

Close up of brown and yellow flowers with a tiny silvery moth.

For many decades Australia’s native pollinators have lived in the shadow of the honeybee. In this article, we shine some light on the intricate roles of a group of tiny moths that pollinate boronias.

A cluster of green and white orchid flowers.

We traced the evolutionary journey of Australia’s greenhood orchids since their origin over 32 million years ago.

A black and white image of virus partilces

A new study of bird flu dynamics in Australia’s wild birds has revealed the virus strains present and how they spread.

Australia’s red meat industry has set itself a goal to be carbon neutral by 2030. CSIRO is working with Meat & Livestock Australia on the science to support this ambition.