Groundwater

Showing the dry land and shrub of the Aṉangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (or APY lands) in South Australia

Researchers have teamed up to uncover an ancient buried water source in South Australia.

A new computer model to predict arsenic pollution will help to support water management decisions and develop new arsenic remediation strategies.

Dry dam with very little water

Day Zero marks the day when residential taps are turned off — a reality for some regional and rural towns across Australia. When this current drought breaks, we can’t lose sight of the fact that another drought will inevitably come. We have to prepare for water security now.

river bed

With many surface water storages, such as reservoirs, empty or critically low, groundwater (underground aquifers fed by rainfall and found in cracks or pores in rock) supplies are critical for many Australian communities and industries.

World-first trials of CSIRO’s automated sensor system, SENSEI, are providing promising, real-time results to better monitor and manage groundwater impacts in mining operations

The launch of a new Australian noble gas facility helps us tackle groundwater issues in conjunction with government and industry.

Understanding impacts and relationships to better manage groundwater in Australia.

man examning copper tube with machine and screens

The Millennium Drought in south east Australia highlighted the value of the continent’s groundwater resources. We need a better understanding of our groundwater systems and how they are recharged to ensure that, as we continue to use this valuable resource and with a changing climate, we also protect it from overuse or contamination. The Southern Hemisphere’s first Noble Gas Facility will provide valuable contributions to do just that.

A helicopter with a large ring suspended from it hovering over landscape

It’s predicted that there will be a three-fold increase in water demand in South Australia between 2010 and 2019 by the mining and energy sector. Using world first techniques combining geophysical data and topographical maps, scientists are exploring if the water is there to support demand.