Disease

A black and white image of virus partilces

A new study of bird flu dynamics in Australia’s wild birds has revealed the virus strains present and how they spread.

Close of photo of a mosquito

Australian summers and mosquitoes go together. But a La Niña year can increase the risk of mosquito-borne diseases.

A sheep and lambs

Vaccines, chemical preventatives, breeding disease resistant animals and clever management practices are a few strategies we're working on to reduce disease and agrichemicals in livestock production systems.

Agriculture uses an array of chemicals to control weeds, pests and diseases. However, a systems approach to reduce, redesign or replace chemical use will be needed to meet new demands.

Researcher Dr Warish Ahmed in the CSIRO laboratory

Scientists have found an early-warning tool for COVID-19 in our sewage to help detect its spread. Here's a run down on how it works.

Pig farm

Disease outbreaks, like extreme events can strike anywhere, at any time. Hot on the heels of severe bushfires in Australia over the summer, heat waves in India and Japan, and locust plagues in Eastern Africa, we have COVID-19. Another disease outbreak is looming large in the agriculture sector: African swine fever.

Coronavirus (Covid-19) is the latest in a series of diseases transmitted to humans from wild animals in recent years. Fellow diseases including Ebola, SARS, Zika and MERS have also terrorised countries around the world, and their emergence stems from complex interactions among wild and/or domestic animals and humans.

Black tiger prawns in hand

CSIRO’s efforts to help the Australian farmed prawn industry recover from this devastating outbreak also required a rapid response to protect a vital research facility that is assisting the industry pick itself back up.

tiger among grasses

An estimated 14 million people die from infectious diseases each year. A key link in the chain of infection is deforestation and increased contact between wild animals and humans. If we're to control the spread of disease, we need to be better at predicting outbreaks.