Issue 296 – Agriculture: Facing the future

Like many other industries, agriculture has an opportunity to improve itself – not only reducing its environmental impact, but also lifting productivity at the same time. This issue of ECOS looks at some of the ways that could happen.

Yellow daisies flowering in a hilly field

Fireweed is a daisy species that is a Weed of National Significance in Australia. We used high-throughput sequencing to construct a family tree that showed it is also present in New Zealand.

Does the relationship between trees and fungi hold the key to regenerating and protecting our eucalypts from widespread forest dieback?

A pelican standing in water

By 2050, the Gippsland Lakes could experience temperature increases of 1.6 degrees Celsius, sea-level rise of 25 centimetres and more frequent bushfires. So what can be done to protect the site?

Soil is at the centre of our lives – it’s keeping us alive, literally! So it’s important we look after the soil that looks after us. A big part of that is access to quality soil data. A new collaborative initiative, the Australian National Soil Information System (ANSIS), is aiming to do just that – provide online access to shared, nationally consistent soil data and information. ANSIS will give us a better understanding of our soils, enabling us to better manage them.

Cattle in a pasture drinking from trough

New maps reveal how climate change could shift agricultural and pastoral margins in Africa by 2050. The CSIRO led data-driven research aims to give farmers – and the global community – insights to safeguard food security and livelihoods into the future.

What do our gut microbiome, soil, persistent chemicals and dung beetles have in common? That’s what our MOSH Future Science Platform is working to find out.

In a world where nutrient deficiencies are common and food costs are rising, could a healthier form of rice be a solution?

How do we produce more protein to feed more people in a more sustainable way? One innovative technique that has emerged as a potential frontrunner in Australia is precision fermentation.

CSIRO Agriculture and Food Director Dr Michael Robertson discusses the trends and research opportunities shaping the industry’s future.