Extreme events

Storm over Mount Porepunkah, Victoria. photographed by Stephen Routledge

New research shows that Victoria’s climate is changing and with that comes the need to better understand how the water cycle is changing and how this will impact on water supplies.

A boat sits on the water while the bush behind it (on the edge of the lake) is on fire.

Sometimes playing with fire is actually the safest option – especially when you’re building houses designed to withstand extreme events.

Lush green forest and mountains surrounding a lake at Cradle Mountain, Tasmania

Scientists examine 19 ecosystems under pressure, from the beautiful to the rare.

Diagram showing resilience planning

Recent extreme climate and disaster events are fresh in our minds given the summer of 2019/20. So it's timely to question what we can do to build climate and disaster resilience to support our communities, the economy and our environment.

Plants resprouting from a tree trunk after fire

Australia is one of the most fire-prone countries on earth. Last summer, as the fires raged, so did the national debate: could we have done more to prevent the carnage? Should we have done more hazard reduction burning?

A map of NSW.

The new NSW Spatial Digital Twin will assist emergency services in developing effective emergency management strategies ahead of the upcoming bushfire season.

Two people in flood waters, one holding a dog

As our climate changes, we'll experience more extreme weather. We're researching how we can create better cities that can withstand heavy rains and floods.

The Black Summer took a heavy toll on Queensland, but will a new bushfire resilience guide for homeowners get the community talking about living with the bush beyond the back fence?

A dam wall and water

A new national forecasting service is giving dam operators, river managers – even kayakers – a clearer picture of river and stream flows up to a week in advance. Paradoxically, uncertainty is a key to more reliable forecasts.