Posts by Andrea Wild

Close up of an echidna in a landscape of short grass.

You might not be living in a biodiversity hotspot, but the plants, animals and fungi around you matter! By recording them, you can contribute to citizen science.

A black and white bird with yellow wings feeding on a white grevillea flower.

The origin of the world’s songbirds is a story that began close to home. Their special ability to detect the sweet taste of sugary food is a similar tale.

A person standing on the deck of a ship holding a weather balloon.

The next generation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander STEM professionals are gaining unique training and experience at sea through a new program aboard RV Investigator.

A person pulling bark aside from a tree.

Language is powerful. It is one way that we, as humans, share knowledge, stories and what matters to us. In partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People, the Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) has been linking language and ancestral, Indigenous ecological knowledge to Western science in its biodiversity data infrastructure.

Tuna in cane baskets on a dock, being inspected by people

With a team at CSIRO’s Australian National Fish Collection in Hobart, Helen O'Neill is working to make fish identification easier for Indonesian fishery workers.

Giant kelp photographed underwater.

Both giant kelp and Synechococcus are being cultured in CSIRO’s Australian National Algae Culture Collection in Hobart, where scientists study impacts on algae in our warming world.

Close-up shot of a Loggerhead turtle with barnacles on its shell swimming over coral reefs.

eDNA is poised to revolutionise the way we monitor Australia’s natural environment but it relies on a complete reference library of DNA barcodes. That's where we step in. CSIRO is working with partners to create this library for Australia’s most important species.

As part of the Genomics for Australian Plants consortium, we are sequencing the genomes of the Queen of Sheba orchid and Hoary Sunray daisy.

A Hawksbill sea turtle swimming over a reef.

A new study using ground breaking science for environmental management has revealed the lifespans of five species of marine turtles.