Issue 267 Oceans

The ocean covers more than two thirds of our planet. It affects almost all aspects of our daily lives – from our weather and climate, through to our food and well-being. In June 2020 ECOS shines the spotlight on research happening across oceans and marine ecosystems.

white sharkunderwater water with sunlight coming through the water

Extensive tracking of the southern-western white shark population has revealed epic oceanic excursions, including a 12,240 km return trip to sub-Antarctic waters.

offshore oil and gas platform in the ocean

Can the rigs of today become the reefs of tomorrow? CSIRO is working with industry partners to explore the future of our oil and gas infrastructure.

Colourful fish and coral at Wheeler Reef in 2012. The reef is situated in the central GBR off Townsville. Picture by Paul Muir.

Two of Australia’s most iconic ecosystems, eucalypt trees and reef corals, could end up being the ‘best of pals’ when it comes to fighting climate change.

Six key messages about climate change and natural disasters from CSIRO climate scientists, presented to the Royal Commission into National Natural Disaster Arrangements.

Wide shot of a prawn trawler

An El Niño event in 2015-16 led to the lowest ever catch in redlegs. Fisheries must work with research to climate-proof their management.

Shipping port.

COVID-19 has exposed vulnerabilities in our global food systems, which have become designed around “just-in-time” principles to maximise efficiency. As we start to look at what life will be like after this pandemic, can we reconfigure our supply chains around resilience and sustainability to guard against the impact of future shocks?

Super-wide view of a beach with ocean in the distance.

What if we could imagine a better, more sustainable future for our oceans? Future Seas 2030 is an innovative, interdisciplinary project doing exactly that.

As Australia comes to grips with the devastating COVID-19 global pandemic, it’s possible to forget that only six months ago […]