Oceans

Norwegian fish farm for salmon growing

With Australia expecting a population growth of 35 million people by 2049, delivering food and energy security will be critical. But how do we meet this growing demand and deliver outcomes that are sustainable and productive?

Antarctica's Totten Glacier

A new report into polar regions, mountains, oceans and coasts shows the impacts of climate change on these sensitive areas are worse than previously thought, with implications for Australia.

The amount of ocean-derived protein consumed in countries in the Pacific Ocean is higher than in any other part of the world. Providing the best science to inform sustainable management of that resource is vital.

The Coral Sea Marine Park is one of the world’s largest marine parks and vital to surrounding Pacific Island countries. A month-long voyage by Australia's research vessel to gather and share data and insights with international colleagues has begun, in pursuit of a better understanding of the area's geodynamic and climatic history, as well as biotic evolution.

CSIRO scientists have developed a new way to account for ozone in computer simulations of the climate. This latest modelling shows that the oceans take much less ozone out of the atmosphere than previously thought. This has implications not only for our understanding of future global warming, but also on human health, plant productivity and the economy.

While the plastic trash swirling around in our oceans gets most of the attention, new evidence shows that the solutions lie along our shoreline.

equipment being winched out of ocean

New camera technology that can withstand enormous water pressure in the deep oceans, and navigate the steep, rugged and rocky terrain of seamounts, is shining new light on deep-sea biodiversity.

breaking wave

In a paper published in Science, climate scientists say we need to look beyond our neighbouring oceans to understand changes several seasons ahead – to the Atlantic Ocean on the other side of the world.

whale approaching the surface of the water

New research reveals how climate change could influence future krill abundance and whale populations in the Southern Hemisphere.