Invasive species

More than 1,770 species in Australia are listed as threatened or endangered. Invasive species are the biggest single threat.

aerial view of island surrounded by blue seas

The humble but prolific house mouse on a remote Western Australian island might serve a crucial purpose for scientists investigating the potential of gene modification as an environmental control for conservation. Community values - as well as science – will determine what’s both possible and acceptable.

a muddle of carp

CSIRO scientists have developed new tools to help control two feral pests wrecking havoc above and below the waters of the Murray-Darling Basin: the willow tree and the carp.

caterpillar in cotton

Global trade means global pests – not just in the way they spread but in the way they breed. Hybridisation of two moth species has now been confirmed, creating a fast-generating, pesticide-resistant mega pest which threatens broad-acre crops across the Americas. What’s next?

computer image of trees

In Northern Australia, researchers have Gamba grass in their sights. They're applying cutting-edge advances in satellite, airborne and terrestrial remote sensing along with emerging tools in computer vision and machine learning to address environmental challenges such as invasive species.

Bird in flight

With rats and mice driving sea birds and other animals on remote islands to extinction, scientists and environmental managers are now turning their attention to new genetic technologies that could offer more targeted solutions than traditional baiting programs. Risk analysis and responsible research is front and centre in the discussion.

Mapping the genome of this hungry caterpillar might help scientists target what makes it such an effective megapest that it can develop resistance to most known insecticides the world over.

Person in yellow standing in snow

Warmer temperatures mean more ice-free areas and increasing terrestrial habitat in Antarctica, but that’s not necessarily good news for Antarctic natives.

fish feeding

Five years ago, ECOS reported on new research investigating the potential for a biological control to manage the problem of carp in the Murray-Darling river system. The ongoing research is now part of a $15m national plan.