Indigenous knowledge

A diver wearing goggles holding a Prickly redfish.

After years of mutual learning, a safety net is in place for the Torres Strait Beche-de-mer Fishery.

Showing the dry land and shrub of the Aṉangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (or APY lands) in South Australia

Researchers have teamed up to uncover an ancient buried water source in South Australia.

Four people holding and inspecting a green fishing net on the edge of water body.

Engagement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in marine research can deliver mutual benefits for researchers and Indigenous people. A new survey has investigated scientists’ motivations, perceptions and practices for engaging Traditional Owners.

More than 100 Indigenous contributors have created Australia’s first guidelines on how to best strengthen and share Indigenous knowledge in land and sea management. 

Super-wide view of a beach with ocean in the distance.

What if we could imagine a better, more sustainable future for our oceans? Future Seas 2030 is an innovative, interdisciplinary project doing exactly that.

smokey fire through bush

How can we support cross-cultural Indigenous fire partnerships to manage Australia's landscape?

With nature declining at an alarming rate, Dr Ro Hill spoke about the promise of environmental stewardship at her Bob Hawke Centre lecture in Adelaide.

A black turtle on sand

We're working with Indigenous rangers in Cape York to give baby turtles the best chance of making it from nest to ocean.

a group of people in a forest at the base of a tree discussing and looking up

Pollinators such as bees, birds, bats and butterflies are in decline globally, a threat to biodiversity and food production all over the world. The importance of pollinators isn’t new to many indigenous communities around the world.