Extreme events

landscape imae of city in the background with clouds

Climate modelling increases our understanding of the impacts of climate change including risk of fire, flood and cyclones. But can we rely on climate projections to manage future risk?

Australia is in the midst of an unfolding extreme bushfire season, with far-reaching impacts for many communities across the nation, particularly in the southern and eastern areas. We wanted to check in with one of CSIRO’s senior climate researchers, Dr Michael Grose, to understand how extreme events like bushfires are linked to climate change, and where science leads to certainty in our understanding and where there are more research questions to be explored.

Dry landscape burning with red son and black trees

Sydney and New South Wales (NSW) north coast residents continue to battle poor air quality as a result of fires burning through the state. Our bushfire expert Andrew Sullivan delves beyond the smoke haze to explain the current crisis and the tough conditions ahead.

A bushfire burns in the distance in Victoria.

The field of climate change event attribution research has emerged recently and can provide new insights into Australian climate extremes.

Burnt pencil pine and alpine flora, Mackenzie fire, Tasmania.

A collision of severe weather events can destroy lives and infrastructure, destabilising economies and ecosystems. In a rapidly warming world the frequency and magnitude of these compound events will only increase, according to the latest report from the IPCC.

chairman of the Asahi Glass Foundation Mr Kazuhiko Ishimura and CSIRO researcher Dr Brian Walker at thBlue Planet Prize 2018 ceremony in Tokyoe

Dr Brian Walker received the Blue Planet Award in Tokyo for his work at the forefront of the interdisciplinary area of resilience of complex adaptive systems. With drought, typhoons, earthquakes and tsunamis all in our region, the award is timely.

tropical island beach

Salamo Fulivai reads the nightly news in Tonga but when Tropical Cylcone Gita arrived it was more than a story. Fortunately, forewarned is forearmed. Just months earlier Salamo had been part of climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction training.

storm clouds over an outback highway fringed with red dirt

As work gathers pace for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s next climate predictions, scientists sense a groundswell of change to try and meet the Paris Agreement.

photo of historic tidal marigram

We're dusting off old tide records, some dating back to the late 19th century, in a project to digitise these old hard-copy records so the data they contain can be used to analyse how extreme sea levels in Australia have changed over time.