Extreme events

Two people in protective clothing by a fire

With a view of bushfires from the ground to the air, CSIRO scientist Matt Plucinski wants Australians to learn from the other crisis of 2020.

People standing on a badly eroded coast line. The image shows the effects of a king tide on Queensland’s Gold Coast beachfront.

COVID-19 has highlighted the need for communities globally to prepare for, and adapt to, natural shocks, including climate change.

As Australia comes to grips with the devastating COVID-19 global pandemic, it’s possible to forget that only six months ago […]

An overhead shot of a baled field.

Regional communities can make necessary changes in response to droughts and other related challenges including the impacts of COVID-19 pandemic using a transition planning approach that builds their resilience and sustainability into the future.

Post-fire recovery

While attention to bushfire recovery often centres on above ground developments – rebuilt buildings and a return of green tree canopies – it's what happens below the surface that often determines how successful recovery actually is.

Bushfire with smoke entering the atmosphere

Australia and the world are facing multiple, successive, widespread disruptions which can lead to catastrophic disaster. A ‘Deconstructing Disasters’ approach can help us to build more resilience in our systems.

Plants resprouting from a tree trunk after fire

We Aussies like to think we’re resilient, but knowing what that looks like at a time of unprecedented challenge takes more than national pride – it takes good science.

Dry dam with very little water

Day Zero marks the day when residential taps are turned off — a reality for some regional and rural towns across Australia. When this current drought breaks, we can’t lose sight of the fact that another drought will inevitably come. We have to prepare for water security now.

A charred black tree with signs of regrowth at the base. The regrowth looks red and green.

Australia’s fire season isn’t over yet, but a significant flux of greenhouse gases have already been released into the atmosphere. Our scientists have been exploring their impact.