Posts – Page 62 – ECOS

A large cylinder and with pipes coming from the ground in a paddock

When attempting to answer questions about whether the coal seam gas industry (CSG) is less greenhouse intensive than the coal industry, one of the big factors to consider is fugitive methane emissions—the amount of methane that leaks from the CSG wells.

Chimpanzee in rainforest setting up close to camera

Scientists have been developing smart new ways of using cameras to deepen our knowledge of ecosystems and their animals.

Fishermam pulling a fish out of the water on the end of a fishing line

Australia’s fishing zone is the world’s third largest, and the $2.4 billion commercial fishing and aquaculture industry employs over 11,000 people. Research helps keep the industry and the marine ecosystem sustainable.

Large shark underwater with spotted appearance and smaller fish following it

El Niño might provide the coastal waters of Western Australia (WA) with some welcome relief from the heat.

Flock of birds flying off shore over beach

Every year five million shorebirds migrate between the Arctic and Australia along a bird superhighway known as the East Asian-Australasian flyway. Coastal development is destroying the tidal flats birds depend on, and sea level rise is emerging as an additional threat. A new artificial intelligence technique offers a conservation solution.

A group of people standing in a grassy paddock with hats on

What will the future look like in 10, 50 or 100 years? Are our human and ecological systems prepared for […]

This time last year we were preparing for a possible El Niño with potentially dire consequences from drought, extreme heat and bushfire in Australia. But then it all just fizzled out. So what happened?

Brown head of a termite showing mouthparts

Insects play an invaluable role in our ecosystems and sustain our society. It's a role that often goes unnoticed and one that we still don't fully understand.

Ship crew throwing a yellow cylinder overboard into the sea

In 1985, when CSIRO's marine labs were launched, a seven-day weather forecast was little better than chance. Now, thanks to advances in our understanding of the oceans, our predictions are far better.