2021

A person pulling bark aside from a tree.

Language is powerful. It is one way that we, as humans, share knowledge, stories and what matters to us. In partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People, the Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) has been linking language and ancestral, Indigenous ecological knowledge to Western science in its biodiversity data infrastructure.

Overhead view of a research vessel at sea.

Australia’s oceans are big, beautiful and bountiful in resources. Our national ocean research vessel Investigator delivers the capability to help us understand and protect them.

Longtail tuna fish in a basket

New DNA and microchemistry analysis reveals multiple populations among the Indian Ocean’s tunas and will underpin improved fisheries management.

Deep sea delights: this coral species, Victorgorgia eminens, and its snake star symbiont, was discovered living in the seamounts off the coast of Tasmania

CSIRO scientists are finding life in Australia’s cold-water ocean depths that few humans ever see.

Tuna in cane baskets on a dock, being inspected by people

With a team at CSIRO’s Australian National Fish Collection in Hobart, Helen O'Neill is working to make fish identification easier for Indonesian fishery workers.

Giant kelp photographed underwater.

Both giant kelp and Synechococcus are being cultured in CSIRO’s Australian National Algae Culture Collection in Hobart, where scientists study impacts on algae in our warming world.

A diver wearing goggles holding a Prickly redfish.

After years of mutual learning, a safety net is in place for the Torres Strait Beche-de-mer Fishery.

A blue, green and white painted research vessel on the open ocean.

RV Investigator’s seafloor mapping systems are increasingly being used to locate and image Australian shipwrecks and other heritage targets.

Oceans are the planet’s largest life-support system. The launch of the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development is an important opportunity for Australia as a nation girt by sea.