Reefs

close up of whale shark from the front

Turtle nail clippings, diving whale sharks and 12 million mushroom corals are key research discoveries from Ningaloo Reef.

White coral with crown-of-thorns starfish on it

New research is helping to prevent outbreaks of crown-of-thorn starfish, a major threat to the Great Barrier Reef.

Colourful fish and coral at Wheeler Reef in 2012. The reef is situated in the central GBR off Townsville. Picture by Paul Muir.

Two of Australia’s most iconic ecosystems, eucalypt trees and reef corals, could end up being the ‘best of pals’ when it comes to fighting climate change.

Satellite image over the Great Barrier Reef showing reef structures

Detection of oil spills using state of the art satellite imagery will support Australian environmental agencies to manage and protect the Great Barrier Reef, and other Australian marine regions.

New results indicate the potential for what's known as 'assisted evolution' can increase the thermal tolerance of corals, and thus help their adaptation to conditions that are currently causing unsustainable stress.

The best scientific minds are applying novel interventions to help the Great Barrier Reef fight and adapt to climate change. From freezing coral larvae to shading and cooling measures, learn how we're hoping to help the Reef.

Ashmore Reef Marine Park is one of Australia's most remote marine parks. Recent fieldwork will help Parks Australia adaptively manage this island sanctuary.

clown fish, sea anemone, clam shell highlighted on reef with sea surface backlit

The Australian public has united with scientists to help them identify what truly makes the Great Barrier Reef ‘beautiful’.

jetty jutting out to sea with island in the background

The eReefs program monitors the Great Barrier Reef using satellite sensors high above the planet’s surface and from a unique marine observatory far below located in coastal waters of the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area.