Oceans

Three small fish orange coloured with white stripes

Amid growing demand for seafood, gas and other resources drawn from the world’s oceans, and growing stresses from climate change, we examine some of the challenges and solutions for developing “the blue economy” in smarter, more sustainable ways. For example, could the diving industry, long criticised as contributing to declines in coral reef health around the world, better contribute to reef conservation?

Many pieces of plastic littered across a sandy beach

CSIRO researchers have been named finalists in the 2015 Eurkea Prize for Environmental Research for their work looking at plastic pollution in the oceans.

Deep sea corals are under threat from climate change. Scientists are searching for ways to protect the fragile ecosystems deep in the ocean.

The carbon sequestration service provided by the oceans comes at a price. The cost of carbon dioxide uptake is a gradual increase in the acidity levels of the oceans, which could have serious impacts on marine life.

Fishermam pulling a fish out of the water on the end of a fishing line

Australia’s fishing zone is the world’s third largest, and the $2.4 billion commercial fishing and aquaculture industry employs over 11,000 people. Research helps keep the industry and the marine ecosystem sustainable.

Large shark underwater with spotted appearance and smaller fish following it

El Niño might provide the coastal waters of Western Australia (WA) with some welcome relief from the heat.

Ship crew throwing a yellow cylinder overboard into the sea

In 1985, when CSIRO's marine labs were launched, a seven-day weather forecast was little better than chance. Now, thanks to advances in our understanding of the oceans, our predictions are far better.

Three children carry a turtle followed by a man in a dark blue uniform

The Dampier Peninsula on the western edge of Western Australia’s Kimberley region is Bardi Jawi country. It’s also green turtle […]

A network of floating data monitors across the world’s oceans has revealed a noticeable rise in temperature, particularly around Northern Australia, in as little as eight years – something that usually takes a lot longer to be recorded.