Bushfire

Post-fire recovery

While attention to bushfire recovery often centres on above ground developments – rebuilt buildings and a return of green tree canopies – it's what happens below the surface that often determines how successful recovery actually is.

Thick smoke covers the Sydney skyline

Over 2.2 million Australian homes and businesses now have a rooftop PV system. What does a summer of smoke, dust and hail mean for solar power generation in Australia?

Plants resprouting from a tree trunk after fire

We Aussies like to think we’re resilient, but knowing what that looks like at a time of unprecedented challenge takes more than national pride – it takes good science.

A charred black tree with signs of regrowth at the base. The regrowth looks red and green.

Australia’s fire season isn’t over yet, but a significant flux of greenhouse gases have already been released into the atmosphere. Our scientists have been exploring their impact.

landscape imae of city in the background with clouds

Climate modelling increases our understanding of the impacts of climate change including risk of fire, flood and cyclones. But can we rely on climate projections to manage future risk?

smokey fire through bush

How can we support cross-cultural Indigenous fire partnerships to manage Australia's landscape?

Australia is in the midst of an unfolding extreme bushfire season, with far-reaching impacts for many communities across the nation, particularly in the southern and eastern areas. We wanted to check in with one of CSIRO’s senior climate researchers, Dr Michael Grose, to understand how extreme events like bushfires are linked to climate change, and where science leads to certainty in our understanding and where there are more research questions to be explored.

Photo of three Glossy Black-cockatoos in a eucalypt tree.

Kangaroo Island’s Glossy Black-Cockatoos are at risk due to the Australian bushfires. What are the issues?

The arsenal of tools to predict and alert the community of advancing fires is the product of close to 70 years of dedicated bushfire science.