Biodiversity

An orange and blue coloured insect on a branch with small green leaves

Indigenous knowledge could soon sit side-by-side with western science in the world’s most comprehensive repository of information about Australia’s plant and animal species—the Atlas of Living Australia. Pilot projects in Arnhem Land and Cape York are revealing how the Atlas might support the needs and aspirations of different Traditional Owner groups.

A new approach to help ecosystems bounce back after human disturbances was applied to a simulated disaster at Ningaloo Reef, and is applicable for decision-makers in other marine and terrestrial contexts.

Plant with reddish-purple berries

Researchers have estimated the number of tropical tree species, and it's likely to be between approximately 40,000 and 53,000. The Indo-Pacific region is as rich in tree species as tropical America.

Three men holding an award

The Tiwi Tropical Fire Ant Project won the Biodiversity category of the 2015 United Nations Association of Australia World Environment Day Awards, for two of the largest invasive ant eradications ever achieved

Blackened earth where a section of forest cleared by fire

It’s now five years since the International Year of Biodiversity, and nearly 15% of Earth’s land surface is protected in parks and reserves. By 2020, we should reach the agreed global target of 17%. This is good news for species diversity, right? Not really.

Chimpanzee in rainforest setting up close to camera

Scientists have been developing smart new ways of using cameras to deepen our knowledge of ecosystems and their animals.

Flock of birds flying off shore over beach

Every year five million shorebirds migrate between the Arctic and Australia along a bird superhighway known as the East Asian-Australasian flyway. Coastal development is destroying the tidal flats birds depend on, and sea level rise is emerging as an additional threat. A new artificial intelligence technique offers a conservation solution.

Brown head of a termite showing mouthparts

Insects play an invaluable role in our ecosystems and sustain our society. It's a role that often goes unnoticed and one that we still don't fully understand.

Stand of trees with a water mark part way up the trunks

New research has examined over 100 years of historical data on Murray-Darling Basin ecosystems to provide an indication of long-term trends in the Basin’s ecological condition.