Conservation

close up of white bird with orange beak

The Australian National Wildlife Collection holds a significant collection of fauna and flora of New Guinea and the Pacific islands, critical to understanding the evolution of species in Australia and the wider Pacific. The Collection now includes bird specimens from New Caledonia, including the iconic Kagu.

rainforest rocky pool surrounded by forest

Australia’s tropical rainforest plants can be identified with just a few simple clicks.

green seedlings sprouting from blackened ground

Most plant research focuses on grown plants or on seedling behaviour. It is only now that researchers are beginning to examine seed traits and how the beginning of a plant’s life affects everything which comes after.

aerial view of island surrounded by blue seas

The humble but prolific house mouse on a remote Western Australian island might serve a crucial purpose for scientists investigating the potential of gene modification as an environmental control for conservation. Community values - as well as science – will determine what’s both possible and acceptable.

aerial of contoured landscape

A special issue of Pacific Conservation Biology celebrates women working in conservation science in Australia.

polluted water cascading over river waterfall

After cascading ecological catastrophes in the 90s, China spent 20 years seriously investing in sustainability. Now that effort is paying off.

diver looking down through blue waters at whale shark

They're elusive, whale sharks, so we're keeping an eye on them using satellite tracking to see how far they travel and, in a world first, taking DNA samples to see just how old they are. Here they are on Ningaloo reef.

tree trunk

Climbing up an 80 m tower is all in a day's work for some scientists. Read how they've been watching over Australia's defining flora - eucalypts - as part of our land ecosystem observatory.

Two people up a tree

Timm Döbert spent three years working towards his PhD based in a research camp in Borneo’s lowland rainforests. It was a chance to study close at hand the human impact on a diverse ecosystem – and a privileged opportunity to marvel at the diversity of life on Earth. It’s also a photographer’s paradise. He and colleagues have shared with us some of their favourite images.