Urban planning

A woman and a child in a garden

COVID-19 is a health and economic crisis that’s taken the world by surprise. Yet this wicked problem may also be an opportunity for Australia to invest in new types of urban infrastructure to make cities smarter, greener, safer, and healthier.

With the cold snap shocking us into our winter woollens, we’re looking at how draughty Australian houses are, and the science behind how we test for ‘leakiness’ in our homes.

As the water count down continues to 'Day Zero' in regional centres in New South Wales and Queensland, how can science provide greater water security into the future?

Handy access to information is the key to encouraging Australians to go green in construction. But we still have a long way to go in making all homes as energy efficient as possible.

satellite image of cyclone of coast of northern Queensland

Counting the costs of physical damage wrought by Cyclone Debbie in Queensland and subsequent floods in northern NSW has already begun. The focus now shifts to how communities invest in infrastructure before the storms. Critical is understanding the multiple impacts and the interdependence of infrastructure.

Woman with cityscape in background

As cities go, Australia's have some of the best air quality in the world. But even the relatively clean air of Australia can contain enough pollutants to impact on our health.

Dense city skyscrapers at night

There will be huge environmental impact if we keep using raw materials as we did in the 20th Century. There is a way to build more sustainably.

artist impression of new development, people on sidewalk next to canal

Our newest laboratory will help develop and test innovative ways to plan and build Australia’s future cities.

Bronte beach and suburb

Communities, governments and businesses in Australia need to work together on innovative strategies that will help adapt their coastal environments so they will be more resilient as extreme weather events driven by climate become more frequent.