Sustainable development

Close up of wheat heads and blue sky in background

By embracing science and technology, Australia's agricultural industry could be more efficient, productive and sustainable.

Australia’s soil, water, vegetation and biodiversity, and our vast marine estate, are incredibly valuable national assets, which need to be managed effectively. There are still significant gaps in our understanding of these components, and the ways in which they interact. We need to understand them so we can manage them sustainably.

Scientists met in Paris recently for the major scientific conference in the lead up to November's UN climate change negotiations. They believe limiting warming to 2˚C is economically feasible, and can be an important contributor to sustainable economic growth.

Barring miracles, or some very rapid advances in medicine, at some stage, you’re going to die. Sad, but true. So let’s assume that you’ve tried to live as environmentally frugally as possible. How can you continue the effort to be sustainable when you yourself aren’t?

Developers often cop criticism for being environmental vandals who’d do anything in the name of profit. But the industry is complex, ranging from one-off ‘mum and dad’ investors to global corporations. One thing they all have in common is that what they produce – residential and commercial developments – will need to perform in future environments that may call into question how or why the structures were built in the first place.