Rivers

A dam wall and water

A new national forecasting service is giving dam operators, river managers – even kayakers – a clearer picture of river and stream flows up to a week in advance. Paradoxically, uncertainty is a key to more reliable forecasts.

Three white birds taking flight from a wetland.

Management of the Lower Lakes system in South Australia has been informed by extensive science. Understanding the impacts of climate change and adaptation remain future challenges for the region and the Murray-Darling Basin as a whole.

A failure to grasp the details of the life of freshwater crocodiles in the places they live is likely to bedevil their conservation.

river bed

With many surface water storages, such as reservoirs, empty or critically low, groundwater (underground aquifers fed by rainfall and found in cracks or pores in rock) supplies are critical for many Australian communities and industries.

reeds appearing above reflective water

While knowledge of water availability is key to managing Murray-Darling Basin water resources, a commensurate understanding of ecosystem ecological response to flow regulation is also required to aid environmental management.

flood waters in weir

There’s an upside to the carbon-rich, black water that sometimes flows off the floodplains and into the rivers of the Murray–Darling Basin.

ibis on tree with rainbow in background

Elvis, Eric, Gracy - these ibis and spoonbill are telling their own journeying stories thanks to satellite tracking. Along with scientists on the ground monitoring populations and their movements, research will help drive effective environmental water management decisions.

a muddle of carp

CSIRO scientists have developed new tools to help control two feral pests wrecking havoc above and below the waters of the Murray-Darling Basin: the willow tree and the carp.

red gums in creek bed

For the first time, scientists have quantified how much water trees on the Murray-Darling floodplain need, and when they need it. The results show that we cannot tell the health of a tree just by looking at its canopy—we need to look inside the tree.