Engineering resilience

Australia could be a leading supplier of sustainably manufactured products across a range of industries by expanding its local precision fermentation capabilities.

2. Aerial flood photographs taken in the Townsville region

Shading corals to reduce mass bleaching and expanding the control of coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish—if socially acceptable and done on a large scale—could buy at least 10 to 20 years for the Great Barrier Reef, according to scientists who have for the first time modelled all of the world’s biggest marine ecosystem.

Snorkeler in the Great Barrier Reef

A study about social responsibility in synthetic biology research and development for conserving the Great Barrier Reef

A woman standing on a raised level of sand, gazing out at the horizon

With Australia expected to experience ongoing sea level rise over the coming decades, high-resolution climate projections are one way to inform quick community adaptation. Elsewhere, scientists are turning to novel nature-based solutions to help defend our coastlines.

A satellite image of the sea - a hue of green and blues.

A new project led out of Germany is investigating how novel ocean negative emission technologies (NETs) might work to slow down the rate of climate change.

The best scientific minds are applying novel interventions to help the Great Barrier Reef fight and adapt to climate change. From freezing coral larvae to shading and cooling measures, learn how we're hoping to help the Reef.

Negative emissions technologies can be a real part of our approach to helping address climate change.

People snorkelling on reef in front of island

There is an imperative to take action to protect and restore the Great Barrier Reef, the question is how we go about it. A new initiative is engaging the community in those decisions.

Bird in flight

With rats and mice driving sea birds and other animals on remote islands to extinction, scientists and environmental managers are now turning their attention to new genetic technologies that could offer more targeted solutions than traditional baiting programs. Risk analysis and responsible research is front and centre in the discussion.