Agriculture

A honey bee on a purple flower

According to a new CSIRO survey, Australia can now proudly call itself home to one of the healthiest populations of European honey bees in the world.

Cows laying down in front of wind turbines

A major study by CSIRO, the Australian National Outlook, reveals Australia has all the tools to achieve economic growth and environmental sustainability - we just have to choose to use them.

Two tractors preparing paddocks for cropping

Scientists have solved one of the mysteries of certain soil bacteria that allows them to persist without an apparent source of sustenance. It might lead to solutions for improving agricultural production while reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Nanopesticides are being hailed as an emerging technology that will minimise the adverse effects of pesticides on people and the environment, but is there sufficient evidence to convince the regulators?

Close up of wheat heads and blue sky in background

By embracing science and technology, Australia's agricultural industry could be more efficient, productive and sustainable.

Australia’s soil, water, vegetation and biodiversity, and our vast marine estate, are incredibly valuable national assets, which need to be managed effectively. There are still significant gaps in our understanding of these components, and the ways in which they interact. We need to understand them so we can manage them sustainably.

The new TRANSIT tool developed by CSIRO is identifying ways to cut the costs of transporting cattle—offering solutions that would reduce the vast distances travelled and the numbers of trucks on the road. The tool will be applied beyond the livestock industry for use more broadly in the agricultural and logistics sectors.

Some climate models show that, under high greenhouse gas emissions, Sydney could be up to 4.8C hotter and have 20% less rainfall by 2090. Others show the Harbour City could warm only by 2.3C and become 25% wetter. How do we deal with such large uncertainty?

Man and woman dancing hand in hand

For most of us, the word drought conjures images of a parched landscape, stunted crops, dry waterways and dead livestock. But what about rain dancing?